Network of Excellence in Internet Science

Future Internet at University of Oslo

Future Internet at University of Oslo

Content:

  • Why do we need a new Internet?
  • Mobility and the Internet, especially for Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks (MANETs)
  • Delay tolerant networks that have to handle short and long term partitions, including the classic Epidemic Routing and Message Ferry approaches. Furthermore, we discuss how MANET routing at the IP layer can be combined with delay tolerant support in the overlay by the example of delay tolerant publish subscribe services.
  • Content networks exemplified through publish subscribe solutions
  • Sensor networks and tools for building smart environment, like Data Stream Management systems to continuously evaluate the readings from sensors and Complex Event processing to analyze the readings from sensors and match them to predefined complex events
  • Approaches for the Future Internet to achieve more autonomic networks, like for example developed in the EU FET project ANA (Autonomic Network Architecture) and to develop more resilient networks.
  • Resilient network architectures and the role of policy based resilience in network management.
  • New and alternative communication paradigms: CacheCast for single source multiple destination communication

CSM040/ CSM012 Advance Topic in Networking at Lancaster University

  • 15/ 20 Lancaster Credit points
  • Master students
  • Requirements: bachelor in computer science, communications or equivalent
  • Delivery: one week block mode teaching in Lent term, 30 hours
  • Content: Future Internet
    • Introduction: Internet and Internet research in context
  • What is Internet Science
    • Mobility and the Internet, especially for Mobile Ad-Hoc Networks (MANETs)
    • Delay tolerant networks that have to handle short and long term partitions, including the classic Epidemic Routing and Message Ferry approaches. Furthermore, we discuss how MANET routing at the IP layer can be combined with delay tolerant support in the overlay by the example of delay tolerant publish subscribe services.
    • Content networks and content centric networks
    • Sensor networks and tools for building smart environment, like Data Stream Management systems to continuously evaluate the readings from sensors and Complex Event processing to analyze the readings from sensors and match them to predefined complex events
    • New network approaches for the Future Internet: Autonomic networking, autonomic network management (for example as developed in the EU FET project ANA -Autonomic Network Architecture) and to develop more resilient networks.
  • Resilient network architectures and the role of policy based resilience in network management.
  • New and alternative communication paradigms: CacheCast for single source multiple destination communication

This course is currently shared between Lancaster University (United Kingdom), University of Oslo (Norway) and University of Mannheim (Germany). It was initially created in the context of the EU NoE E-Next (2004 – 2006) and has been taking place since then every Spring. It was also supported through the EU NoE CONTENT from 2006 – 2009. In addition to today’s partners, the Technische Universität Dramstadt (Germany) and Eurecom (France) formed this course and Aalto University (former Helsinki University of Technology, Finland), and University of Coimbra (Portugal) have been involved. Given the history of this course and the involved partners, the main topic of the course to date is Future Internet but from a purely technological viewpoint mainly aiming at computer science students (or closely related areas).

The basic approach of this joint distributed course is that at each involved University a local instance of the course is instantiated, i.e., a course is proposed and approved by the participating institution, it has a local course code, it is embedded in the local curriculum, and follows the local assessment regulations, etc. This aspect of local adaptation (which effectively amounts to a “cloning” under local condition) is very important in order to make the joint distributed course feasible since all Universities have different rules and procedures. Experience shows that a fully unified joint course is impossible to create let alone establish at different institutions within a few years. Hence the focus of such a joint activity is more on the key aspects make the approach a joint distributed course rather than common procedures, timelines or administrative elements. The following elements are shared resp. jointly performed:

  • Teachers are shared, i.e., lecturers travel to a partner University to give one or more lectures (if funding for travelling is available)
  • Lectures are shared, i.e., they are recorded (currently using a tool called Lecturnity). The recording contains audio, video, and all interactions with the imported Powerpoint transparencies. The recordings are placed on a web server and are available 24/7 for all students that are registered for the course at all locations.
  • A joint lab assignment over six weeks in which four students solve together one assigned problem. Typically, such a team comprises each two students from two Universities. The assignment comprises some experimental work (implementation, measurements, etc.) and the documentation of their results in form of a paper (IEEE style, max 10 pages). The involved Universities provide supervisors for the assignments. Further, they agree on a coursework mark on a neutral scale between 0 .. 100. Each University maps then the result to their local grading scheme.